wishmaker7:

birdghost:

irl-spain:

sentimentalslut:

people say ‘I love you’ in a lot of different ways

'eat something'

'buckle up'

'get some sleep'

'here have my fries'

'Im gonna draw you something'

'yeah i'll buy it for you'

shared hace 1 semana, with 327 431 notas » via tigerstark / source + reblog



 “EL NIÑO, THE KID, IL BAMBINO” - Part 2  

How did you handle the critics when you spent so long without scoring? 
Apparently in England there’s a difference between the papers who brag about being serious publications and the really sensationalist ones. It isn’t something that affects me, really. 

But, tell me, what was it like during those weeks when you just couldn’t score? 
Media-wise, it was made quite sure that the situation appeared more extreme than it really was. I always tried to take the whole thing as normally as I possibly could. That’s why I went to training every day, to work myself out, to be focused, to forget about what might’ve happened the weekend before, and to prepare for the next match. And if it that went wrong too, I simply told myself I had to keep on working. 

You left Liverpool for Chelsea. How did that came to be? Did your desire to win titles conquered above everything else? 
It’s during situations as extreme as that one when you truly get to know a club, and the people who surround you. A certain story about my departure was fabricated and sold to the press, a story that pointed all fingers towards me, and the reason that version of the events was so successful was because at that time, Liverpool was very powerful, media-wise. From that moment on, it was all about finding new ways to attack me. They were trying to find someone to blame, and they did. They’re like that, in England. But that’s not the right way to go on about it, blaming people. In my opinion, pointing fingers and looking for culprits in these type of situations, and I mean when it comes to matches, transfers, signings, etc., is very mediocre. There is no need to do that because there’s never only one culprit, it’s never black or white, there are many version of the same story, and perhaps many truths. They had their version, and that was the only version the media got their hands on, and I didn’t feel like talking then… maybe that was a mistake. But it’s in the past now. In that moment, I saw how certain people within the club began acting: they told me one thing, and then they told the press a very different thing. It came to a point, after several things had happened, where I could finally see that they weren’t about to keep their word, their promises. But one thing became very clear: I’d only ever had one home, and that was Atlético. And that if I had left home with the sole purpose of winning, I had to keep on trying. Chelsea gave me that opportunity, and in that sense, it worked. 

Liverpool is a working class town, full of hard working people. Is it more similar to your Fuenlabrada than the luxurious London? 
There’s such a big contrast. Liverpool fit me perfectly, in every way: from the relationship between the supporters and the players, to the kind of people who live there, hard-working, humble people. Good people. I’ve heard some people saying that Liverpool is a dangerous place, because of certain areas or neighborhoods that are perceived to be everything but glamorous, but I loved that more than anything. I loved that because I’d grown up in a very similar place. And that’s something that stays with you forever, it brands you. And it wasn’t like that at all you know, “dangerous”. People always did their best to see you happy and to help you in every way they could, they were only waiting for the weekend to arrive so they could go watch their team play. That’s what gets them through the day sometimes. I spent three and a half years of my life living there, and they were exceptional years. My boy was born there, and I’m really proud of the fact that his birth certificate says that he is from Liverpool. 

Funnily enough, your debut as a Blue was against Liverpool, at Stamford Bridge, and you lost. Were you able to concentrate at all or was it practically impossible to get any sleep the night before?
It was a very, very difficult week to get through. I just couldn’t believe my eyes. The way the Liverpool supporters perceived me had changed so drastically in a matter of days, from one week to the other. But that’s what they had been told, what they had read, that’s the story they were being sold, and I can’t blame them for believing it. But I was really, really affected by that and it still hurts, because I have nothing but love for them. Nothing but love, respect and admiration, after having spent such fantastic three and a half years by their side. And that’s something nothing will ever change. Even if I go back to Anfield and I get booed and jeered at as I have before, it won’t change how I feel about them. I wouldn’t dare to say a bad word about Liverpool fans, only that they were very intoxicated at the time, they were told a story that was untrue. To be honest I wasn’t able to think about football that week. For months, everything was so strange. I wouldn’t advise anyone to change clubs during the winter. 

Can you give us a scoop about the truth that will come out one day? 
All in due time. (x)
“EL NIÑO, THE KID, IL BAMBINO” - Part 2  
How did you handle the critics when you spent so long without scoring?
Apparently in England there’s a difference between the papers who brag about being serious publications and the really sensationalist ones. It isn’t something that affects me, really.
But, tell me, what was it like during those weeks when you just couldn’t score?
Media-wise, it was made quite sure that the situation appeared more extreme than it really was. I always tried to take the whole thing as normally as I possibly could. That’s why I went to training every day, to work myself out, to be focused, to forget about what might’ve happened the weekend before, and to prepare for the next match. And if it that went wrong too, I simply told myself I had to keep on working.
You left Liverpool for Chelsea. How did that came to be? Did your desire to win titles conquered above everything else?
It’s during situations as extreme as that one when you truly get to know a club, and the people who surround you. A certain story about my departure was fabricated and sold to the press, a story that pointed all fingers towards me, and the reason that version of the events was so successful was because at that time, Liverpool was very powerful, media-wise. From that moment on, it was all about finding new ways to attack me. They were trying to find someone to blame, and they did. They’re like that, in England. But that’s not the right way to go on about it, blaming people. In my opinion, pointing fingers and looking for culprits in these type of situations, and I mean when it comes to matches, transfers, signings, etc., is very mediocre. There is no need to do that because there’s never only one culprit, it’s never black or white, there are many version of the same story, and perhaps many truths. They had their version, and that was the only version the media got their hands on, and I didn’t feel like talking then… maybe that was a mistake. But it’s in the past now. In that moment, I saw how certain people within the club began acting: they told me one thing, and then they told the press a very different thing. It came to a point, after several things had happened, where I could finally see that they weren’t about to keep their word, their promises. But one thing became very clear: I’d only ever had one home, and that was Atlético. And that if I had left home with the sole purpose of winning, I had to keep on trying. Chelsea gave me that opportunity, and in that sense, it worked.
Liverpool is a working class town, full of hard working people. Is it more similar to your Fuenlabrada than the luxurious London?
There’s such a big contrast. Liverpool fit me perfectly, in every way: from the relationship between the supporters and the players, to the kind of people who live there, hard-working, humble people. Good people. I’ve heard some people saying that Liverpool is a dangerous place, because of certain areas or neighborhoods that are perceived to be everything but glamorous, but I loved that more than anything. I loved that because I’d grown up in a very similar place. And that’s something that stays with you forever, it brands you. And it wasn’t like that at all you know, “dangerous”. People always did their best to see you happy and to help you in every way they could, they were only waiting for the weekend to arrive so they could go watch their team play. That’s what gets them through the day sometimes. I spent three and a half years of my life living there, and they were exceptional years. My boy was born there, and I’m really proud of the fact that his birth certificate says that he is from Liverpool.
Funnily enough, your debut as a Blue was against Liverpool, at Stamford Bridge, and you lost. Were you able to concentrate at all or was it practically impossible to get any sleep the night before?
It was a very, very difficult week to get through. I just couldn’t believe my eyes. The way the Liverpool supporters perceived me had changed so drastically in a matter of days, from one week to the other. But that’s what they had been told, what they had read, that’s the story they were being sold, and I can’t blame them for believing it. But I was really, really affected by that and it still hurts, because I have nothing but love for them. Nothing but love, respect and admiration, after having spent such fantastic three and a half years by their side. And that’s something nothing will ever change. Even if I go back to Anfield and I get booed and jeered at as I have before, it won’t change how I feel about them. I wouldn’t dare to say a bad word about Liverpool fans, only that they were very intoxicated at the time, they were told a story that was untrue. To be honest I wasn’t able to think about football that week. For months, everything was so strange. I wouldn’t advise anyone to change clubs during the winter.
Can you give us a scoop about the truth that will come out one day?
All in due time. (x)
shared hace 1 semana, with 129 notas » via en-prosa / source + reblog



 "EL NIÑO, THE KID, IL BAMBINO" - Part 1


And then, all of a sudden, Fernando Torres signed for A.C. Milan. What was your first memory of the club? 
I was seven or eight years old when my sister went to Italy for a school trip. She got me a Milan shirt as a gift. 

There’s someone at the club who I’m sure perfectly understands what being a striker is all about, Filippo Inzaghi. 
Inzaghi was a great goal scorer, and I am convinced he will know how to get the best of me. He will teach me and guide me through this new adventure, I’m convinced. 

One thing is clear. Milan’s interest in you goes way back. They’d set their eyes on you when you still played for Atlético. 
A very, very long time ago now. It’s as if destiny had this in store for me and was hoping to see me play at San Siro sooner or later. 

You arrive to Italy after spending six seasons in Spain and seven seasons in England. Do you feel like you’re an english footballer now, more than anything? 
I feel like an international footballer. It’s very hard to remember how it was like playing in Spain sometimes, and La Liga’s changed so much, there’s so many contrasts now. The difficult situations many clubs are facing at the moment, compared to where Barcelona and Real Madrid are… even though Atleti’s managed to make a difference. The good thing is that it’s not considered unusual for a spanish player to play aboard nowadays. I remember that when I was starting out, people used to complain a lot about the foreign players in La Liga. And when the country began having financial difficulties, they understood. They realized that there was no reason to be scared to leave. 

Do you feel like it was a privilege having played in England for so long? 
Yes, England’s football culture is very pure. The whole thing is so well-structured, so thoroughly planned, in every way. They’ve managed to handle the whole T.V. rights situation fantastically, and there aren’t 40 football television programs out there, but one or two, that everyone watches religiously. And of course the schedule is very convenient when it comes to getting people in Africa, Asia or the United States to watch the games. They also get the Stadiums to be at their full capacity week in and week out, because people actually want to see their team play! There’s so much left to do in that sense in Spain, specially where Barcelona and Real Madrid are concerned, both being the most popular clubs in the world. They should sort out the T.V. rights situation and get the other clubs to have as much visibility as those two, and maybe then the league will start being more competitive. 

You were already an english speaker back in Fuenlabrada, because of your older brother Israel’s music taste… 
I’ve always been, and still am, a big, big Nirvana fan because of my brother. I grew up listening to their music because when I was little, there was only one music tape at home, and my brother always called the shots as he was the oldest. I read a book about Kurt Cobain’s life very recently: when he was a kid, he liked to listen to music in other languages because he felt very connected to the melodies, while not necessarily to the lyrics. Now that I actually understand his lyrics, perhaps I don’t feel as identified as I did before, but it’s the music I grew up with, and the one I still listen too. Lots of rock and roll, lots of punk-rock.  

At Atleti, you carried a big responsibility on your shoulders. You were a home-grown player and the team’s captain. At Liverpool, you were considered a legend despite not winning any titles, and at Chelsea, you won almost every title there was to win, yet we didn’t get to see the best version of you. How’s that for an evolution? 
They were three different stages in my life, and in each of them I had different roles, and in each of them there were good and bad moments. Everyone dreams about having an important role in the clubs they play, and about winning everything at those clubs, but that doesn’t happen very often. In fact it rarely does. I was lucky enough to be able to make my debut as a professional football player for Atleti, at the Calderón at that, which had been my dream since I was little. But beyond that, I never actually thought that I’d get anywhere. I wasn’t expecting any of this to happen. Beyond that, everything’s been a gift. Of course I would’ve liked to have won everything at Atlético, but I couldn’t do it. It’s still a thorn in my side that perhaps will stay there forever, but I will always be proud of the fact that I played my heart out for that shirt. It’s because of that that the people at the club and the supporters still remember me with affection, and I value that more than any title. I had to leave because in that moment, I didn’t feel like staying would do anything for my career, and I felt like we were growing apart, our paths were going in different directions. At Liverpool, everything was perfect at a personal level, but ultimately, I left the Calderón to win titles, and I wasn’t getting them at Anfield either. And then I decided to take another step forward and Chelsea seemed like the better option. However, at Stamford Bridge my role as player became much more secondary, and I had less of an impact than I did at Liverpool or Atlético, but when it came to winning titles, the club gave me everything. If I had the chance to somehow unify these three experiences and have them all in one club, I would, but that’s impossible isn’t it? 

To have won everything so soon, to be that good that young, do you think it’s affected people’s perception of you? 
But I hadn’t won anything then! At 25 I still hadn’t won a thing, club-wise. I talked about it with Puyol once, and he told me: “Niño, I was 28, I played for Barcelona, and I hadn’t won anything”. And then in a matter of three years he lifted every trophy there was to lift, three times each. It’s all about spells, periods, winning streaks.  When things are going well, you have to take every bit of advantage you can, and when they’re not, you can only work harder to get better, because the opportunity to do so will come. And you have to be ready. In a matter of two years I was able to win all those trophies I hadn’t even come close to winning the years before. And it’s not just me, look at Atleti, for example. They hadn’t won anything in 18 years, and look how much they’ve accomplished in recent times. If you had told that to a fan four, five years ago, they would’ve laughed in your face. The same goes for clubs like Chelsea, or Manchester City. (x)
"EL NIÑO, THE KID, IL BAMBINO" - Part 1
And then, all of a sudden, Fernando Torres signed for A.C. Milan. What was your first memory of the club?
I was seven or eight years old when my sister went to Italy for a school trip. She got me a Milan shirt as a gift.
There’s someone at the club who I’m sure perfectly understands what being a striker is all about, Filippo Inzaghi.
Inzaghi was a great goal scorer, and I am convinced he will know how to get the best of me. He will teach me and guide me through this new adventure, I’m convinced.
One thing is clear. Milan’s interest in you goes way back. They’d set their eyes on you when you still played for Atlético.
A very, very long time ago now. It’s as if destiny had this in store for me and was hoping to see me play at San Siro sooner or later.
You arrive to Italy after spending six seasons in Spain and seven seasons in England. Do you feel like you’re an english footballer now, more than anything?
I feel like an international footballer. It’s very hard to remember how it was like playing in Spain sometimes, and La Liga’s changed so much, there’s so many contrasts now. The difficult situations many clubs are facing at the moment, compared to where Barcelona and Real Madrid are… even though Atleti’s managed to make a difference. The good thing is that it’s not considered unusual for a spanish player to play aboard nowadays. I remember that when I was starting out, people used to complain a lot about the foreign players in La Liga. And when the country began having financial difficulties, they understood. They realized that there was no reason to be scared to leave.
Do you feel like it was a privilege having played in England for so long?
Yes, England’s football culture is very pure. The whole thing is so well-structured, so thoroughly planned, in every way. They’ve managed to handle the whole T.V. rights situation fantastically, and there aren’t 40 football television programs out there, but one or two, that everyone watches religiously. And of course the schedule is very convenient when it comes to getting people in Africa, Asia or the United States to watch the games. They also get the Stadiums to be at their full capacity week in and week out, because people actually want to see their team play! There’s so much left to do in that sense in Spain, specially where Barcelona and Real Madrid are concerned, both being the most popular clubs in the world. They should sort out the T.V. rights situation and get the other clubs to have as much visibility as those two, and maybe then the league will start being more competitive.
You were already an english speaker back in Fuenlabrada, because of your older brother Israel’s music taste…
I’ve always been, and still am, a big, big Nirvana fan because of my brother. I grew up listening to their music because when I was little, there was only one music tape at home, and my brother always called the shots as he was the oldest. I read a book about Kurt Cobain’s life very recently: when he was a kid, he liked to listen to music in other languages because he felt very connected to the melodies, while not necessarily to the lyrics. Now that I actually understand his lyrics, perhaps I don’t feel as identified as I did before, but it’s the music I grew up with, and the one I still listen too. Lots of rock and roll, lots of punk-rock. 
At Atleti, you carried a big responsibility on your shoulders. You were a home-grown player and the team’s captain. At Liverpool, you were considered a legend despite not winning any titles, and at Chelsea, you won almost every title there was to win, yet we didn’t get to see the best version of you. How’s that for an evolution?
They were three different stages in my life, and in each of them I had different roles, and in each of them there were good and bad moments. Everyone dreams about having an important role in the clubs they play, and about winning everything at those clubs, but that doesn’t happen very often. In fact it rarely does. I was lucky enough to be able to make my debut as a professional football player for Atleti, at the Calderón at that, which had been my dream since I was little. But beyond that, I never actually thought that I’d get anywhere. I wasn’t expecting any of this to happen. Beyond that, everything’s been a gift. Of course I would’ve liked to have won everything at Atlético, but I couldn’t do it. It’s still a thorn in my side that perhaps will stay there forever, but I will always be proud of the fact that I played my heart out for that shirt. It’s because of that that the people at the club and the supporters still remember me with affection, and I value that more than any title. I had to leave because in that moment, I didn’t feel like staying would do anything for my career, and I felt like we were growing apart, our paths were going in different directions. At Liverpool, everything was perfect at a personal level, but ultimately, I left the Calderón to win titles, and I wasn’t getting them at Anfield either. And then I decided to take another step forward and Chelsea seemed like the better option. However, at Stamford Bridge my role as player became much more secondary, and I had less of an impact than I did at Liverpool or Atlético, but when it came to winning titles, the club gave me everything. If I had the chance to somehow unify these three experiences and have them all in one club, I would, but that’s impossible isn’t it?
To have won everything so soon, to be that good that young, do you think it’s affected people’s perception of you?
But I hadn’t won anything then! At 25 I still hadn’t won a thing, club-wise. I talked about it with Puyol once, and he told me: “Niño, I was 28, I played for Barcelona, and I hadn’t won anything”. And then in a matter of three years he lifted every trophy there was to lift, three times each. It’s all about spells, periods, winning streaks.  When things are going well, you have to take every bit of advantage you can, and when they’re not, you can only work harder to get better, because the opportunity to do so will come. And you have to be ready. In a matter of two years I was able to win all those trophies I hadn’t even come close to winning the years before. And it’s not just me, look at Atleti, for example. They hadn’t won anything in 18 years, and look how much they’ve accomplished in recent times. If you had told that to a fan four, five years ago, they would’ve laughed in your face. The same goes for clubs like Chelsea, or Manchester City. (x)
shared hace 1 semana, with 174 notas » via en-prosa / source + reblog


hiddleston-daily:

Tom Hiddleston at the Wheatland Music Festival (x)

shared hace 1 semana, with 1 401 notas » via tigerstark / source + reblog


hellasterek:

Things Jeff Davis and his team should spend time discussing (an excerpt):

  • What is our timeline?
  • How old are our characters?
  • How did Cora survive the fire, how did she get to South America and with whom did she stay there?
  • Why does Derek survive being nearly ripped to shreds by Peter in 1x06 but being shallowly impaled by Derek’s claws kills Boyd in3x07? What can and can’t kill a werewolf?
  • Does is make sense for this character in this particular situation to act this way?
  • How can we make it believeable that Malia would attend High School with the other characters despite living in the woods for eight years?
  • Where is Malia’s (adoptive) father? How would she react towards him upon finding out he isn’t her biological father?
  • If it’s a hitlist instead of a deadpool, shouldn’t we actually call it a hitlist to avoid confusion, even if it sounds less cool?
  • How can certain characters simply walk out of a mental institution?
  • How can we explain that a character who committed mass murder in a hospital while being filmed by multiple security cameras isn’t in prison?
  • Why was Braeden with Satomi’s pack? Who shot her, and why? Where did her (nearly fatal) gunshot wound disappear to?
  • How is Melissa allowed to do this when she’s only a nurse?
  • How does Meredith control the printers?
  • Also how did she programme the computer hidden behind a wall when she a) didn’t have the key and b) no access to the computer?
  • Where did the berserkers come from? How does Kate control them?
  • How did Braeden survive having her throat ripped out, whereas Kate was turned into a werecreature?
  • How did Kate know how to deage Derek?
  • How did Meredith know that Kate would use Derek to break into the vault? How did she know when Derek wasn’t a supernatural being anymore?
  • Why did deaging Derek make him lose his powers, and why did dying turn him into a full wolf?
  • How did Meredith manage to control Brunski?
  • Why would Meredith listen to Peter’s rantings and believe he would build a world that’s safer for humans when all he talked about was creating a stronger supernatural species?
  • Is it really necessary for the plot to have two teenagers hook up in the dirty basement of a mental asylum without protection while one of them is under the influence of drugs?
  • Where did various characters disappear to and how do we explain their absence (Danny, Isaac, Ms Morrell)?
  • What are the powers of Kira, Lydia, the emissaries etc.?
  • Why is Kate a werejaguar?
  • How does a fox make physical manifestations of its tails?
  • Does it make sense to suddenly have a supernatural ward in Eichen House when its existence has never come up in previous seasons even though it would have presented a viable option to retain supernatural criminals?
  • What did the alpha pack really want to do with the power they amassed?
  • Do we really need to fridge another female character for Derek Hale’s tragic backstory?
  • Why is Peter suddenly growing stronger again?
  • Do we really need to add this many new characters, especially villains?
  • Should we scrap this slo mo fight scene for a character driven one?
  • Why would the nogitsune leave a voicemail on Allison’s phone, and how was it suddenly turned off when she didn’t do it?
  • Do we really need to include this heavily romanticised dub-con sex scene?
  • How can we make sure to show the audience the characters are still grieving the loss of their loved ones other than a few sad looks and one line in the finale?
  • If Scott lived with his father pre season 1, how can we work out a believable storyline for their estrangement in season 3b? Why did Scott move to his mother?
  • Why would Jennifer try to get the werewolves to committ suicide in Motel California when they don’t fit into any of the categories she needs for her sacrifices?
  • How do we deal with the emotional fallout of certain scenes, like Scott trying to kill himself, or making creepy advances towards Allison while possessed?
  • Are our characters distinguishable and unique instead of cardboard cutouts of recycled tropes (especially women, POCs and LGBT characters)?
  • Should we really include this plot line when it is dropped in the next episode and not mentioned again, or rather spend the time on something more important?
  • Does this plot really make sense?
  • No, ask again. Really? Are you sure?

Things Jeff Davis and his team spend a lot of time discussing:

  • Does the date not look romantic enough if Kira keeps wearing her leather jacket that she’ll need later in the fight?
shared hace 1 semana, with 4 768 notas » via hellasterek / source + reblog


alasborricadas:

virginiourbina:

iraffiruse:

Tratando de dormir cuando vas borracho

jajaja y sí

BREAKDANS!

shared hace 1 semana, with 59 069 notas » via patadasderealidad / source + reblog


I’m still surprised when I see I have a message.

I’m still excited when I get a new follower.

I’m still happy when a post of mine actually gets notes.

And I still appreciate each and every one of you who continues to follow me no matter how silly, or annoying, or weird I am.

shared hace 1 semana, with 209 272 notas » via hellasterek / source + reblog


yayfeminism:

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
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normanreedusitalia:

bigbaldhead Norman on the October 2014 edition of GQ’s age issue *-*

normanreedusitalia:

bigbaldhead Norman on the October 2014 edition of GQ’s age issue *-*

shared hace 1 semana, with 492 notas » via verysharpteeth / source + reblog


powells:

Banned Books Week starts today! How many of these banned books have you read?

powells:

Banned Books Week starts today! How many of these banned books have you read?

shared hace 1 semana, with 687 notas » via udnoestaaqui / source + reblog


JR Bourne: [Your impression of me] makes me sound like such a stoner. (x)

shared hace 1 semana, with 8 559 notas » via hellasterek / source + reblog


torrilla:

@DrGotts: My shot of glorious Tom Hiddleston @twhiddleston for @FollowWestwood & @climate_rev, with @Greenpeace #SaveTheArctic http://t.co/IznxrbsJV3

torrilla:

@DrGotts: My shot of glorious Tom Hiddleston @twhiddleston for @FollowWestwood & @climate_rev, with @Greenpeace #SaveTheArctic http://t.co/IznxrbsJV3

shared hace 1 semana, with 8 305 notas » via tigerstark / source + reblog


sebastian stan → favorite outfits

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amzical:

25 Famous Women on Choosing to Be Childfree 
Some of my favorites:
"I’m completely happy not having children. I mean, everybody does not have to live in the same way. And as somebody said, ‘Everybody with a womb doesn’t have to have a child any more than everybody with vocal cords has to be an opera singer." —Gloria Steinem
"If I had kids, my kids would hate me … They would have ended up on the equivalent of the Oprah show talking about me; because something [in my life] would have had to suffer and it would’ve probably been them." —Oprah Winfrey
"Honestly, we’d probably be great parents. But it’s a human being, and unless you think you have excellent skills and have a drive or yearning in you to do that, the amount of work that that is and responsibility — I wouldn’t want to screw them up! We love our animals." —Ellen DeGeneres
"I would have been a terrible mother because I’m basically a very selfish human being. Not that that has stopped most people going off and having children." —Katharine Hepburn
"There have been times when I wanted children and other times I’ve been grateful not to have them. I am a mess if I have to say goodbye to my dog for longer than five days. I don’t know how I would deal with kissing my children as I left for work. I know there are women who are able to do that. I don’t know if I could." —Anjelica Huston
"I’m a woman of a certain age who doesn’t have kids and never really settled down … I enjoy kids but not for long periods. I think they’re adorable and funny and sweet, and then I have a headache."—Kim Cattrall
"I definitely don’t want to have kids … I don’t think I’d be a great mother. I’m a great aunt or friend of a mother … I don’t want to spend that kind of time. I don’t want to have a kid and have it raised by a nanny. I don’t have time to raise a child.” —Chelsea Handler
"This is not my destiny. It never was. And there is a curious rush of joy that I feel, knowing this to be true—for it is every bit as important in life to understand who you are NOT, as to understand who you ARE. Me, I’m just not a mom … Having reached a contented and productive middle age, I can say without a blink of hesitation that wouldn’t trade my choices for anything." —Elizabeth Gilbert 
"I don’t know why women need to have children to be seen as complete human beings." —Marisa Tomei

amzical:

25 Famous Women on Choosing to Be Childfree

Some of my favorites:

"I’m completely happy not having children. I mean, everybody does not have to live in the same way. And as somebody said, ‘Everybody with a womb doesn’t have to have a child any more than everybody with vocal cords has to be an opera singer." —Gloria Steinem

"If I had kids, my kids would hate me … They would have ended up on the equivalent of the Oprah show talking about me; because something [in my life] would have had to suffer and it would’ve probably been them." —Oprah Winfrey

"Honestly, we’d probably be great parents. But it’s a human being, and unless you think you have excellent skills and have a drive or yearning in you to do that, the amount of work that that is and responsibility — I wouldn’t want to screw them up! We love our animals." —Ellen DeGeneres

"I would have been a terrible mother because I’m basically a very selfish human being. Not that that has stopped most people going off and having children." —Katharine Hepburn

"There have been times when I wanted children and other times I’ve been grateful not to have them. I am a mess if I have to say goodbye to my dog for longer than five days. I don’t know how I would deal with kissing my children as I left for work. I know there are women who are able to do that. I don’t know if I could." —Anjelica Huston

"I’m a woman of a certain age who doesn’t have kids and never really settled down … I enjoy kids but not for long periods. I think they’re adorable and funny and sweet, and then I have a headache."—Kim Cattrall

"I definitely don’t want to have kids … I don’t think I’d be a great mother. I’m a great aunt or friend of a mother … I don’t want to spend that kind of time. I don’t want to have a kid and have it raised by a nanny. I don’t have time to raise a child.” —Chelsea Handler

"This is not my destiny. It never was. And there is a curious rush of joy that I feel, knowing this to be true—for it is every bit as important in life to understand who you are NOT, as to understand who you ARE. Me, I’m just not a mom … Having reached a contented and productive middle age, I can say without a blink of hesitation that wouldn’t trade my choices for anything." —Elizabeth Gilbert 

"I don’t know why women need to have children to be seen as complete human beings." —Marisa Tomei

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The Moon by Nosigner is a topographically-accurate LED light created based on data retrieved from the Japanese lunar orbiter spacecraft Kaguya, appropriately named after the legendary Japanese moon princess Kaguya-hime.
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